Sen. Rand Paul Complains The Wealthy Pay The Most Income Tax, Ignores Massive Payroll Taxes Paid By Poor And Middle Class

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky) appeared on “The View” to plug his new book, “The Case Against Socialism,” and lament that wealthy people pay most of the income tax.

Paul failed to mention that poor and middle-class Americans have to pay huge payroll taxes, which rich people usually do not.

Paul repeatedly and falsely called Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) a supporter of “socialism,” even though Sanders has said for years that he supports “Democratic socialism.”

Paul also tried to link Sanders with the despotic ruler of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro Moros.

Co-host Ana Navarro said Moros was a “corrupt, murderous thug who is starving his people,” but Paul insisted that’s not true.

“That’s not true?” Navarro shot back. “Maduro is not a thug and murderer who is starving his people?”

“That’s kleptocracy, not socialism,” Navarro said, as Paul objected. “I can’t let you finish if you’re not going to say Maduro’s a murderous thug.”

Pulitzer Prize-winner David Leonhard recently explained in the New York Times how the richest Americans actually pay less in taxes:

For the first time on record, the 400 wealthiest Americans last year paid a lower total tax rate — spanning federal, state and local taxes — than any other income group, according to newly released data…

President Trump’s 2017 tax cut, which was largely a handout to the rich, plays a role, too. It helped push the tax rate on the 400 wealthiest households below the rates for almost everyone else. ..

The overall tax rate on the richest 400 households last year was only 23 percent, meaning that their combined tax payments equaled less than one quarter of their total income. This overall rate was 70 percent in 1950 and 47 percent in 1980.

For middle-class and poor families, the picture is different. Federal income taxes have also declined modestly for these families, but they haven’t benefited much if at all from the decline in the corporate tax or estate tax. And they now pay more in payroll taxes (which finance Medicare and Social Security) than in the past. Over all, their taxes have remained fairly flat.

The combined result is that over the last 75 years the United States tax system has become radically less progressive.

(Source: ABC-TV via YouTube, The New York Times)

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