Kansas City Royals Makes Players Attend Anti-Porn Lecture With Mormon Ties

During their spring training camp, the Kansas City Royals GM Dayton Moore brought in an organization called Fight The New Drug (FTND) to speak to the players about opposing pornography, which is legal in most cases.

The FTND website states that it “is “passionate about influencing an entire generation to rise up and fight the status quo, rejecting the idea that porn is healthy, normal, or cool.”

The homepage on the website brags about the Royals siding with them, which has not been confirmed by the players themselves who were forced to listen:

In FTND’s awareness-raising presentation to the players, we specifically focused on how porn can impact a consumer’s overall well-being, which in turn can affect productivity, performance, and personal image.

Seeing as they are all constantly in the spotlight and in the public eye, and setting an example for those who look to them for inspiration, this issue is something that can greatly impact not only their careers, but also their lives.

“It says a lot about the organization, that they care so much,” said FTND Co-Founder and President Clay Olsen. “Not only do they care about how the players perform on the field, but they also care about the overall well-being of the players and how they’re doing off the field, as well.”

FIND’s Fortify Program was co-developed by Dr. Jason Carroll of Brigham Young University, a Mormon institution and Olsen’s alma mater, according Lauren Parker, writing for Medium, who also notes there is a lack of science behind FIND’s mission:

They cite Psychology Today and other not peer-reviewed publications on their blog, but the Fortify program is glaringly missing any citation of statistics or how this information was collected.

FTND and Olsen specifically keep enthusing that what they are trying to do is encourage conversation. However, Olsen and FTND are marketing people. They have no right or credentials to promote any actual discourse on the topic, which is what makes the Fortify program so insidious. It’s well shot, well pitched, and seamlessly blends into support and recovery rhetoric.

(Sources: CBS Sports, Fight The New Drug, Medium, Photo Credit: Fight The New Drug/Instagram)

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