Focus On The Family Praises Pro-Torture Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales

Focus on the Family’s political arm, Family Policy Alliance, praised former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales on August 1.

Family Policy Alliance CEO Paul Weber interviewed Gonzales about his new book, a speech he was going to give to the Christian activist group and President George W.Bush’s Christian faith. Gonzales and Weber lamented rulings by what they referred to as activist courts and judges.

Absent from the conversation was any mention of Gonzales’ approval of the torture of suspects while he was attorney general under Bush or Gonzales’ abandonment of America’s commitment to key provisions of the Geneva Convention.

The Atlantic notes:

“On February 7, 2002 — ten years ago to the day, tomorrow — President George W. Bush signed a brief memorandum titled “Humane Treatment of Taliban and al Qaeda Detainees.” The caption was a cruel irony, an Orwellian bit of business, because what the memo authorized and directed was the formal abandonment of America’s commitment to key provisions of the Geneva Convention. This was the day, a milestone on the road to Abu Ghraib: that marked our descent into torture — the day, many would still say, that we lost part of our soul. Drafted by men like John Yoo, and pushed along by White House counsel Alberto Gonzales, the February 7 memo was sent to all of the key players of the Bush Administration involved in the early days of the War on Terror.”

“[Gonzales] signed the January 25, 2002, memo to the president arguing that the 1949 Geneva Conventions offer no protection to any prisoners seized in Afghanistan; the memo dismissed some of the Geneva provisions as ‘quaint.’ This memo signaled Bush’s break—over vigorous objections from Secretary of State Colin Powell—with the generous interpretation of the Geneva Conventions used under every president from Harry Truman through Bill Clinton. It also led to Bush’s refusal to provide the individual hearings required, both by Geneva and by Army regulations, for the hundreds of alleged ‘unlawful combatants’ at his Guantanamo Bay prison camp.”

(Sources; Family Policy Alliance, The Atlantic)

(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)

You might be interested in

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *